Union Correspondence

DILLON'S PLANTATION, MISS., May 12, 1863---9.15 p.m.
Maj. Gen. JOHN A. MCCLERNAND, Comdg. Thirteenth Army Corps:


General McPherson gained Raymond this afternoon, after a severe fight of several hours, in which we lost from 400 to 500 killed and wounded. The enemy was driven at all points, leaving most of his wounded and over 100 prisoners in our hands.
He retreated toward Clinton, and no doubt to Jackson. I have determined to follow, and take first the capital of the State. Accordingly, McPherson is ordered to move at daylight from Raymond toward Clinton and Jackson. Sherman leaves here at 4 o'clock in the morning, in the same direction. You will start with three of your divisions as soon as possible, by the road north of Fourteen-Mile Creek, to this place, and on to Raymond. The road is plain, and cannot be mistaken. A supply train left Grand Gulf yesterday, and Blair's division, with an additional train, to-day.
Under present instructions, these trains will divide at the forks of the road where you and Sherman separated this morning. I would direct, therefore, that your Fourth Division go back to Old Auburn, and wait until these trains come up, both of them, and conduct them after the army on the Raymond road, until they receive further orders from these headquarters.

U. S. GRANT.


DILLON'S PLANTATION, MISS., May 12, 1863--9.15 p.m.
Maj. Gen. WILLIAM T. SHERMAN, Comdg. Fifteenth Army Corps:

After the severe fight of to-day at Raymond and repulse of the enemy toward Clinton and Jackson, I have determined to move on the latter place by way of Clinton and take the capital of the State, and work from there westward. McPherson is ordered to march at daylight to Clinton. You will march at 4 o'clock in the morning and follow McPherson. McClernand will follow you with three divisions, and send his fourth back to Old Auburn, to await the arrival of trains now on the road and Blair's division, to conduct them to the army.

U.S. GRANT.


FOURTEEN-MILE CREEK, MISS., May 12, 1863--10.45 a.m.
Maj. Gen. J. B. MCPHERSON,
Comdg. Seventeenth Army Corps:

Sherman has gained the crossing at this place with a little fighting for it, the enemy having first destroyed the bridges, however. McCler-nand is west from here on the Telegraph road with three divisions, and one thrown around by Baldwin's Ferry. No news from him yet, but firing reported in that direction. If you have gained Raymond, throw back forces in this direction until communication is opened with Sherman. Also feel to the north toward the railroad, and, if possible, destroy it and the telegraph. If the road is opened, I will ride over to see you this evening, but I cannot do so until I know McClernand is secure in his position.

U.S. GRANT.


DILLON'S PLANTATION, MISS., May 12, 1863--9.15 p.m.
Maj. Gen. J. B. MCPHERSON, Comdg. Seventeenth Army Corps:

Move on to Clinton and Jackson at daylight in the morning. Sherman will leave here at 4 a.m. to follow and support you. McClernand will also follow from his position, which is about 4 miles northwest from here.

U.S. GRANT.


RAYMOND, May 12, 1863--11 p.m.
Maj. Gen. U.S. GRANT, Commanding:

GENERAL: It is rumored, but with how much truth I have not been able to ascertain, that heavy re-enforcements are coming to the enemy from Jackson to-night, and that we may expect a battle here in the morning. I shall try and be prepared for them if they come.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,
JAS. B. McPHERSON.


HDQRS. SEVENTEENTH ARMY CORPS, May 12, 1863-9.50 a.m.
Brig. Gen. M. M. CROCKER, Comdg. Seventh Division:

GENERAL: I am directed by the major-general commanding to request you to have your division turn out under arms at 3.30 a.m. to-morrow, to give particular attention to your pickets, grand guards, and outposts, instructing your officer of the day to make a thorough inspection of all the guards after 12 o'clock to-night, cautioning the men to be on the alert against any surprise.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,
[WM. T. CLARK,]
Assistant Adjutant-General.


RAYMOND, MISS., May 13, 1863.
Maj. Gen. JOHN A. MCCLERNAND,
Comdg. Thirteenth Army Corps:

Colonel [William L.] Duff will point out to you where you can report your command, and march to this place in two columns. McPherson moves direct on Clinton. Sherman takes a right-hand road, about 1 mile from town, and moves toward Jackson.
I want you to place one division at the point of divergence of the two advance corps, and leave the balance in town and back toward my camp of last night. It would be well to leave one division back at or near Dillon's plantation. This is where Sherman camped last night.

U.S. GRANT.


HEADQUARTERS THIRTEENTH ARMY CORPS, May 13, 1863.
Maj. Gen. U. S. GRANT,
Comdg. Dept. of the Tennessee:

GENERAL: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your dispatch of this date. In pursuance of your instructions, I set my army corps in motion at 6 a.m., and arrived at this place about 3 p.m. I sent General Osterhaus' division forward to Raymond, but upon reaching the creek, 4 miles this side, I am just informed by him, he found General Steele's wagon train just starting, and may not be able to reach Raymond to-night, in consequence. If not, he will be at Raymond at 5.30 a.m. to-morrow. He is instructed, upon reaching Raymond, to make a detail of one regiment, and to fully execute your orders in relation to guards, hospital, and police discipline of soldiers, according to your instructions of yesterday. I sent General Smith's division to guard, from New Auburn to Raymond, the ammunition and provision trains on their way from the Gulf, together with the trains of the Thirteenth Army Corps. The latter only has arrived. The other divisions I moved on the north side of Fourteen-Mile Creek. In order to effect this movement safely, and to make a demonstration as directed by you, I threw General Hovey's division forward within 2 miles of Edwards Depot, and drew it up in line of battle until the Ninth and Fourteenth Divisions had crossed Baker's Creek, which was attended with some delay, on account of having to explore the road and construct a ford, the bridge having been destroyed. In consequence of this delay, General Hovey's division did not arrive until 4.30 p.m. I am happy to be able to report that this movement has been safely effected without loss, although the rear guard was attacked, and we had to skirmish with the enemy, whom we dispersed. On withdrawing the division from its position, I had anticipated trouble in effecting so delicate a movement with my flank and rear both exposed to attack.

Your obedient servant,
JOHN A. McCLERNAND.


RAYMOND, Miss., May 13, 1863--7.30 p.m.
Major-General MCCLERNAND,
Comdg. Thirteenth Army Corps:

Move one division of your corps through this place to Clinton, charging it with destroying the railroad, as far as possible, to a point on the direct Raymond and Jackson road. Move another division 3 or 4 miles beyond Mississippi Springs, and 8 or 9 miles from this place, and a third to Raymond, ready to support either of the others. Also direct your 30 pounder siege guns to follow close behind the advance guard of the division which takes post beyond Mississippi Springs, on the main Jackson road. You will begin your movements at 4 a.m. to-morrow. McPherson reached the railroad at Clinton at 3 p.m., without encountering any serious opposition.

U.S. GRANT.


HDQRS. THIRTEENTH A. C., Fourteen-Mile Creek, May 13, 1863.
Brigadier-Generals HOVEY, OSTERHAUS, and CARR:

Division commanders are notified that the general commanding the department has changed the direction of the general movement from Edwards Station to Jackson, Miss., via Raymond, and that he has required that the Fourteenth, Twelfth, and Ninth Divisions of this corps move on the road north of Fourteen-Mile Creek to Raymond, via Dillon's plantation, the present headquarters of the department.

The execution of this movement will pass the flank and rear of our force in face of the enemy (close by) between Edwards Station and Bolton, and will require great vigilance and promptitude.
General Hovey will move his division forward at 6 o'clock in the morning, to the first favorable position beyond the point where three roads converge in advance of his present outpost. Of course, skirmishers will be sent in advance. On reaching such a position, he will form in line of battle and cover the other divisions, while they file in his rear to the right, on the Raymond road.

The Ninth and Fourteenth Divisions will hasten to follow the Twelfth Division in this order, to the point where they will turn to the right on the Raymond road, and, when they have passed the Twelfth Division, will fall in the rear and protect it.
The baggage and ammunition trains of the three divisions, and ambulances, except five empty ones to a division, will be sent back by 6 a.m. to the Baldwin's Ferry and New Auburn road, some 2 miles in the rear, to be forwarded on that road under the protection of a detachment from the Tenth Division.

Division commanders will see that their men are provided with at least 80 rounds of ammunition per man, and three days' rations in their haversacks.

Each division commander will leave with the ammunition train an officer.

General Hovey will use the cavalry to guard the rear and exposed flank against surprise.

JOHN A. McCLERNAND.


FOURTEEN-MILE CREEK, May 13, 1863.
Brig. Gen. A. J. SMITH:

GENERAL: I am just advised by General Grant that he has changed the direction of his movement from Edwards Station to Raymond and Jackson. He desires your division to be sent to Old Auburn, to await the arrival of two trains and conduct them after the army from that place, via Raymond, until they overtake it, or different orders are given. One of these trains left Grand Gulf on the 11th instant, under the escort of Blair's division; another left yesterday. I suppose Blair's division will, together with your division, form the escort from Old Auburn forward.

The three divisions of the Thirteenth Army Corps here are required by the commander of the department to move from here by the road north of Fourteen-Mile Creek, via Dillon's plantation, to Raymond. This will make it necessary that three divisions shall pass their flank find rear in front of the enemy's position between Edwards Station and Bolton. Hence I have determined to send the trains of these divisions back to the road leading from Baldwin's Ferry, via New Auburn, to Raymond immediately, moving your division from its present position on the same road to the point where it intersects this (the Old Auburn and Edwards Station) road. You will hasten forward the trains, your own excepted, on the Baldwin's Ferry and New Auburn road, under an escort, to be detached from your command, until they overtake their divisions. The escort may remain in advance until you come up to it, or you may order it back to rejoin you, as you may prefer.

I desire you to hasten to the point 2 miles in my rear, to which I have ordered the trains of divisions with me, as, if they get there before you, they may be exposed to attack. Any movements you can safely make and not delay you, which would impart the design of a movement against Edwards Station, might assist the delicate movement to be made by the other divisions of the corps in the morning in front of the enemy.

The general is inexplicit as to the detachments guarding Baldwin's Ferry, but I cannot believe that he instructs that they should be left behind and exposed to the danger of capture or dispersion. Report often of your progress and state.

Your most obedient servant,
JOHN A. McCLERNAND.


IN THE FIELD,
Crossing of Fourteen-Mile Creek, May 13, 1863.
Maj. Gen. U.S. GRANT,
Comdg. Dept. of the Tennessee:

GENERAL: Your dispatch instructing me to move by the road north of Fourteen-Mile Creek to Dillon's plantation, and thence to Raymond, is received, and will be promptly executed; and also your instructions in regard to the guarding of the expected supply train. I infer that General Blair's division will also escort the supply train. In moving by the road north of Fourteen-Mile Creek to Dillon's, my flank and rear may be exposed to attack from the enemy's line between Edwards Station and Bolton; nevertheless, I will try and protect myself to the best advantage.

JOHN A. McCLERNAND.


RAYMOND, MISS., May 13, 1863.
Maj. Gen. WILLIAM T. SHERMAN, Comdg. Fifteenth Army Corps:

Move directly toward Jackson, starting at early dawn in the morning. McPherson will start at early dawn from Clinton, which place he reached at 3 p.m. to-day without difficulty.
Two of McClernand's divisions will be thrown forward, one by the Clinton road, and one by the road where you are.

U.S. GRANT.


RAYMOND, MISS., May 13, 1863.
Maj. Gen. J. B. MCPHERSON, Comdg. Seventeenth Army Corps:

GENERAL: Move at early dawn upon Jackson. Sherman will move at the same hour by the direct Raymond and Jackson road. McClernand will be brought up to this point with his rear, and his advance thrown on the two Jackson roads.

U.S. GRANT.


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